Pros & Cons of different machines - HELP MY PURCHASING DECISION :)!

Can anyone give me some “Pros & Cons” of the different machines? I have a first generation Cricut that is used about 3-4 times a year, so I obviously don’t need something with all the bells & whistles as I’m not about to go cray-cray… but then again, who knows??

I think at this point my specifications would be that I’d like something that cuts a 12" piece of paper (instead of the current 6" I can cut)… can take advantage of the latest technologies… and maybe give me the chance to get into some new materials. Would prefer to keep it under $300 with a bundle.

Thoughts? Recommendations?

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I just bought a Maker, but I’m afraid to take it out of the box :grin:! Right now I’m trying to learn Design Space. I figured I would just “go big”! I read a lot of reviews and that’s what all the Cricut users recommend.

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I went with a Cameo 3 because of the ability to work offline unlike the Cricut. I only heard bad things about Cricut which made me also go with a Silhouette.

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I love my cricut! But would like to get the cameo 4 for the size. I do more and more large signs and it would be so nice not to have to piece together.

I have a new Silhouette Cameo 4 and love it!
No wifi needed and Studio is the best design software I came across.
I bought it from SilhouetteAmerica.com as a Valentines bundle for $299.00 total with tools and supplies included.
Just check out their website for specials.

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This is very similar to the discussion here: Pros and cons between latest silhouette and cricut machines

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I think for what you are wanting to use it for, the Cricut Explore Air 2 is the best bang for the buck. I have both that and the Maker, but would only recommend the maker if you want to cut fabric. Check out the bundles on Cricut and amazon!

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and this discussion too.

I’d look at the software too!

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Software is an important part of the package. If you are doing your own designs and editing, and don’t have vector software such as Illustrator or Inkscape, you may prefer Silhouette Design Studio (one of the paid editions), because it allows you to do Bezier editing inside the same software that you use to cut or draw.