SVG Files

Hi Everyone, I hope you are all keeping well :grinning: Could you please help me as I am new to creating SVG’s for cricut etc. and wanted to know about exporting. I have created seperate layers but wanted to know how you export them for best quality. Do they need to be flattened? Thanks in advance

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Hi Maria. I’d be interested in seeing people’s replies to your question as I too am looking to add SVGs to my store soon. I’m trying to gather as much information as possible before uploading any, so I don’t fall foul of any newbie mistakes! :smiley:

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Hi Maria,
What program do you use to create separate layers from?

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I know, me too! :grinning:

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Hi Jo, I use Affinity Designer

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I am not familiar with Affinity designer. I tried it but it isn’t for me. Do you have AI?

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No I’m afraid not, just Affinity.

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I use Illustrator to create my designs and I’m not sure what you mean by flattened, but when I publish layered designs, I’d often include several cut file variations, for instance - one svg file including all the layers stacked on top, another svg with the layers sliced, for those who don’t like layering vinyl and I’d often include separate files for the separate layers.

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I ues Illustrator, I don’t have experience of Affinity Designer I’m afraid

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No problem, thanks anyway :slightly_smiling_face:

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Thanks Alexandra. As I’ve never even seen a cutting machine, this is where things get tricky to know why you need to create different versions of the SVG file. I wish there was a manual online, that explains what people can do with the different file types and how they need to be exported for different cutting machines :thinking:

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I wish there was a manual too when I was starting out :laughing:. When I opened my shop and right after I quit my regular job the first thing I did was to purchase a cutting machine (I got Silhouette cameo 3), so I can test all my files and actually experience the whole process.
For file types (SVG, PNG, DXF, EPS) which are usually provided with a cut file download - these are mostly for the different brands of machines. Most cutting machines can work with a SVG file, but the basic software of Silhouette, for instance, can only work with DXF files or their proprietary file type (.studio3). To use SVG file with Silhouette you need to buy a software upgrade, and not everyone are going to do that so you have to include a DXF. PNG files are there for people who want to either print the image, or trace it.
As for the cut file variations - I provide these, because people like to approach project in different ways, some are comfortable with having one layer of vinyl on top of another, other prefer the colors of the design to fit like a puzzle, resulting in only one layer in the final project. I include a similar to this image in my products to help visualize that difference in the files:


Also for instance, if you have a bundle of 6 designs, some people prefer them to be in separate files, some - all designs in one file, so I provide both options.
I hope all of this makes sense :grinning:
One advise I could give is to just google most popular cutting machines and watch a few youtube tutorials so you can get an idea of what they do and how they do it. You can also install Cricut design space or Silhouette studio and just look around (you don’t have to have a machine to test the software).
Let me know if anything is unclear and I’ll try to explain further :slightly_smiling_face:

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Thanks so much Alexandra, that’s really helpful! :smiley: I’ve downloaded the Cricut design space, but I really need now to watch the YouTube videos. Sounds like I’m a way off being ready to create SVGs, but better to take time to get it right now. Thanks again, really appreciate you taking the time to explain this! :+1:

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Thanks Alexandra, that’s really useful information :smile:

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Definitely good for those who aren’t good at figuring out how to slice (remove underlayers), versus those who want all the underlayers for 3-dimensional cards and scrapbooking.

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Thanks Alexandra, that’s helpful and useful to know. I just wanted to know by svg with ‘layers sliced’?

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Thanks Alexandra, that’s helpful and useful to know. I just wanted to know by svg with ‘layers sliced’?

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@Maria_L3 By sliced I mean how the file is composed (this mostly applies for projects that have 2 colors or more when finished). In the image I posted as an example above, the right variation has a solid background and the petals sit on top of it. As for the left image - the background layer is “sliced” (the petals are extracted from it) so when you combine both layers they fit like puzzle pieces and no colors are overlapping (imagine you are making this design from vinyl for instance). The final sunflower from both variations looks exactly the same, it is just achieved in a slightly different way.
Hope that makes it clear :slightly_smiling_face:

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Thanks for getting back to me Alexandra and yes I understand now, you explain it very well, thank you :grinning:

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Thanks Alexandra, I was also looking for info on this. You’ve explained this very well :smiley: