Vector Table Set in Illustrator P2 (Plate)

This is “Part 2” of a series of tutorials. “Part 1. Tablecloth” can be located here (Vector Table Set in Illustrator P1 (Tablecloth)).

1 - In Illustrator open the file used in the first tutorial. Create a “New Layer” by clicking on the small icon at the bottom of the “Layers Panel”. Or, create a “New Document”.

2 - Select the “Ellipse Tool” (L), click inside the canvas and create a 150 by 150 mm circle.

3 - Center it using the “Horizontal and Vertical Align Center” options on your in the “Align Panel” (or use the Top Menu) and make sure that “Align to Artboard” is selected.

4 - Go to Object > Path > Offset Path and use a -22 mm “Offset” value. Leave the other values as default and click “OK”.

5 - Select the first circle and set the “Stroke” color to “None” and the “Fill” to a Linear Gradient. Make the gradient start with a light Grey (K=30) @ 30% “Location” and use White (#ffffff) as the second color @ 90% “Location”. Use a 90° Angle.

6 - “Copy” the rectangle (Command/Control + C) and “Paste in Front” (Command/Control + F).

7 - With the duplicate selected, head to Object > Path > Offset Path and use a -0.8 mm “Offset” value. Leave the other values as default and click “OK”. Set the “Fill” to a Linear Gradient from K=5 @ 0% “Location” to K=20 @ 75% “Location”. Use a 90° Angle.

8 - With it still selected, head to Effect > Stylize > Feather with a “Radius” of 1.76 mm.

9 - Select the second circle created in ”Step 4”(middle), set the “Stroke” color to “None” and the “Fill” to a Linear Gradient. Make the gradient start with very light Grey (K=5) @ 0% “Location” and use K=30 as the second color @ 90% “Location”. Use a 135° Angle.

10 - With it still selected, head to Effect > Stylize > Feather with a “Radius” of 1 mm.

11 - Go to Object > Path > Offset Path and use a 5 mm “Offset” value. Leave the other values as default and click “OK”. Set the “Fill” to a Linear Gradient from K=10 @ 0% “Location” to K=20 @ 85% “Location”. Use a 135° Angle.

12 - With it still selected, head to the “Appearance Panel” and “Delete” the “Feather” effect by clicking on the small Trash Can icon at the bottom of the panel. Then, click on the “Effects” button at the bottom and navigate to Blur > Gaussian Blur. Use a 5 pixels “Radius”.

13 - Select the circle created in ”Step 4”(middle) again, then, go to Object > Path > Offset Path and use a -4 mm “Offset” value. Head to the “Appearance Panel” and “Delete” the “Feather” effect by clicking on the small Trash Can icon at the bottom of the panel. Then, set the “Fill” to a Linear Gradient from K=10 @ 0% “Location” to K=30 @ 70% “Location”. Use a 135° Angle. Click on the “Effects” button at the bottom of the “Appearance Panel” and navigate to Blur > Gaussian Blur. Use a 4 pixels “Radius”.

14 - Go to Object > Path > Offset Path and use a -11 mm “Offset” value. Leave the other values as default and click “OK”. Set the “Fill” to a Linear Gradient from K=16 @ 0% “Location” to K=12 @ 70% “Location”. Use a 135° Angle.

15 - Then, go to Object > Path > Offset Path and use a -3.5 mm “Offset” value. Give the “Stroke” a 2 pt “Weight” and change the color to “Red” for now. In the Top Menu, change the “With Profile” to “With Profile 1”.

16 - Go to Object > Transform > Scale and use a 122% “Uniform” value. Make sure the “Scale Stroke and Effects” box is not checked and click “Copy”. Then, select the same circle used before and go to Object > Transform > Scale, but this time use a 112% “Uniform” value. Make sure the “Scale Stroke and Effects” box is not checked and click “Copy”. Now, create an “Offset Path” with a 9 mm “Offset” value. Leave the other values as default and click “OK”. You should have 4 red circles.

17 - Use the “Add Anchor Point Tool” (+) to add a couple of extra points to the middle circles leaving roughly a quarter of the circumference between them. Place them on opposing sides of each circle. Use the “Direct Selection Tool” (A) to select them and click “Cut path as selected anchor points”. Then, select the other portions of the circle (“Shift” key) and delete them.

18 - Select the remaining paths and change the “Stroke” color to a shade of Grey (K=14). Then, head to the “Appearance Panel”, click on the “Effects” button at the bottom and navigate to Blur > Gaussian Blur. Use a 3 pixels “Radius”.

19 - Now, use the “Add Anchor Point Tool” (+) to add a couple of extra points to the inner and outer circles leaving roughly a quarter of the circumference in the inner one and half of the outer one. Place them on opposing sides of each circle. Use the “Direct Selection Tool” (A) to select them and click “Cut path as selected anchor points”. Then, select the other portions of the circle (“Shift” key) and delete them. Change the outer path “Stroke Weight” to 5 pt and change the color to K=5%. Then, head to the “Appearance Panel”, click on the “Effects” button at the bottom and navigate to Blur > Gaussian Blur. Use a 4 pixels “Radius”.

20 - Select the other path (inner circle), change the path “Stroke Weight” to 15 pt and change the color to White (#ffffff). Then, head to the “Appearance Panel”, click on the “Effects” button at the bottom and navigate to Blur > Gaussian Blur. Use a 6 pixels “Radius”. If the shape is too close to the inner rim of the plate, use the arrow keys to move it.

21 - Select the outmost circle of the plate, head to the “Appearance Panel”, click on the “Effects” button at the bottom and navigate to Stylize > Drop Shadow and use the following values: Mode: Multiply, Opacity: 60%, X Offset: 0mm, Y Offset: 2.5 mm, Blur: 1mm, Color: #000000.

22 - You can change the gradient colors in some portions of the circles to change the “Depth” of the plate depending on your design needs to make it look more flat or more deep.

23 - Check it out!

by @lornacane

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